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» » Lost Horizon
Lost Horizon
Title:

Lost Horizon

Author:
James Hilton
ISBN:
1409235122
PDF book size:
1689 kb
ePub book size:
1822 kb
Fb2 book size:
1943 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf lrf docx
ISBN13
978-1409235125
Rating:
4.8 of 5
Votes:
250
Publisher:
Lulu Enterprises, UK Ltd (October 8, 2008)
Language:
English
Subcatergory:
Action and Adventure
Pages:
136
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Lost Horizon by James Hilton
PDF format

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Lost Horizon by James Hilton
ePUB format

1689 downloads at 25 mb/s

Lost Horizon by James Hilton
FB2 format

1822 downloads at 25 mb/s
British diplomat Robert Conway and a small group of civilians crash land in the Himalayas, and are rescued by the people of the mysterious, Eden-like valley of Shangri-la. Protected by the mountains from the world outside, where the clouds of World War II are gathering, Shangri-la provides a seductive escape for the world-weary Conway.
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7 Reviews
  • I'm a fast reader but this 153 page novel took me as long as a 500 page book. It is so intricately written. There were words I was looking up on every page, yet it was not pretentious in the least. Never was there a time when I could predict what would happen next. Then end was a little abrupt and you are left feeling a bit unsatisfied but upon reflection, I think that's by design.

    NOTE: I also got the audio version of this book and it is HORRIBLE. One person described it as just a reading, not an acting out. There was no inflection or change of voice among characters. It is virtually "unlistenable."

  • Long ago I saw the old film based on this novel, and just finished reading it. The story did not disappoint, and is very well-written. Although I pretty much knew the plot and the ending since the film is largely faithful to the book, I still really enjoyed reading it.

    Central to the story is the existence of a mysterious valley in the Himalayas that is largely unknown to mankind. Here in the 21st century, feeling that we live in a world so small, seemingly completely known and mapped by satellite, this may seem not only quaint but difficult to use as a main theme for a story. Nevertheless, I found it very easy to slip right into the narrative and suspend disbelief.

    The story line is refreshingly linear and easy to follow. One thing I liked about the book that I did not quite get out of the movie was the way in some of the characters and their thought processes are described. In particular, the inner mind and personality of Hugh Conway is much better revealed than it could be in any film version. It also gives the more thoughtful reader a few things to contemplate regarding the nature of life and time.

  • This book is worth pushing through the stilted prose. The themes that the novel explores are universal. What is the purpose of life? What is love? Is longer life worthwhile?
    So many questions that don't necessarily get answered but allows the reader to start exploring these ideas. The last part of the novel is surprising. Glad that I read this one.

  • English writer James Hilton wrote several good novels, but the best of them may be "Lost Horizon", a fantastical story about four Westerners, kidnapped from an airstrip in India, only to crash-land in Tibet. They find shelter at the mysterious monastery of Shangri-La. The four westerners receive the hospitality of the Lamas, but there is a larger game afoot, one revealed to the British diplomat Conway, the senior member of the party. The story he is told is incredible, and yet, it might be true. And if it is true, it changes everything...

    "Lost Horizon" is a quick but delightful read, and a page-turner. Hilton's quickly-sketched characters come to life, even as the author builds the suspense. The story is not told in chronological order, and the reader is left to draw his own conclusions about what really happened in a hidden valley, somewhere in Tibet. Highly recommended.

  • A classic that I somehow had missed. It seems like a simple plot on the surface- a small group of people with little in common kidnapped and brought to strange, remote place and told they may not be able to leave. Through the disparate sensibilities and worldviews of those involved, however, the book pushes hard on themes of loneliness, ambition, greed, and purpose in life- to name only a few. The more I think about the characters and how they experience Shangri-La, the more you realize just how complex a work this is. A very fast read once you get into the narrative portion of the book.

  • This is such a great book it is one of my absolute favorite books. It was the first book I ordered when I received my candle. I also ordered the audible selection so that I could listen listen to it when I don't have the ability to sit and read a book. It is also one of my favorite movies. As they say the book is always better than the movie and in this case the book and the movie are equal partners. I have read this book several times and thoroughly enjoy the storyline. If you ever dream of finding a utopia where time does not matter this is a book for you. It haseverything you need for a good story, adventure, suspense, love, fantasy and very thought-provoking. Several of James Hilton's books have been made into movies and to me that is a great sign of an awesome book. I would recommend this book to everyone who loves to read.

  • This utopian adventure novel, first published in 1933, is the first time Shangri-La appears in any story. I was shocked to learn that it wasn’t an ancient myth, but a creation of an English author who also wrote Goodbye Mr. Chips, during the period between the two world wars. After reading Lost Horizon I can see why. Shangri-La is not only a utopian sanctuary, but a place where the trappings of the Old World, Europe before World War I, are preserved and mix with the exotic cultures of the East. Where the ravages of time can be slowed and peace can reign. The story itself is like something from a dream, intriguing and yet a bit hazy. And odd but refreshing read.